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Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Traditional conservation in Papua New Guinea found in the catalog.

Traditional conservation in Papua New Guinea

Traditional conservation in Papua New Guinea

implications for today

  • 299 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research in Boroko, Papua New Guinea .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Agriculture -- Papua New Guinea -- Congresses,
  • Soil conservation -- Papua New Guinea -- Congresses,
  • Water conservation -- Papua New Guinea -- Congresses

  • Edition Notes

    StatementLouise Morauta, John Pernetta, William Heaney, editors.
    SeriesMonograph / Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research -- 16, Monograph (Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research) -- 16
    ContributionsHeaney, William, Morauta, Louise, Pernetta, John, Papua New Guinea. Office of Environment and Conservation.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsS625P35 T73
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 392 p. :
    Number of Pages392
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20033355M

    Dr. West’s most recent books are Dispossession and The Environment: Rhetoric and Inequality in Papua New Guinea (, Columbia University Press and winner of the Columbia University Press Distinguished Book Award), From Modern Production to Imagined Primitive: The World of Coffee from Papua New Guinea (, Duke University Press) ( Located on the Huon Peninsula in Papua New Guinea (PNG), the YUS Conservation Area was the first of its kind in the country. Named after the three rivers flowing through it – Yopno, Uruwa and Som – it covers 1,km² of pristine habitat accessible only by foot, .

    Fortunately for the international conservation establishment, TNC and WWF maintain respectable footholds in Papua New Guinea, staffed largely by locals who respect and understand the hundreds of. In Traditional Conservation in Papua New Guinea: Implications for Today, edited by L. Morauta, J. Pernetta & W. Heaney, pp. 1 97 –1 Boroko: Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research.

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA country report 6 CHAPTER 1 Papua New Guinea and its Agricultural Economy INTRODUCTION The island of New Guinea is the second largest in the world. It lies between and 12 degrees south of the equator in the region referred to as equatorial or the `hot-wet tropics'. The island is approximately 2, kilometres from. Abstract: We investigated traditional coral reef management practices at Ahus Island, Manus Province, Papua New Guinea, to evaluate their social role in the community and potential to conserve reef ecosystems. For generations, Ahus Islanders have prohibited spear and net fishing within six delineated areas of their reef lagoon. One to three times per year, fish are briefly harvested from the.


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Traditional conservation in Papua New Guinea Download PDF EPUB FB2

A significant contribution to political ecology, Conservation Is Our Government Now. is an ethnographic examination of the history and social effects of conservation and development efforts in Papua New Guinea.

Drawing on extensive fieldwork conducted over a period of seven years, Paige West focuses on the Crater Mountain Wildlife Management Area, the site of a biodiversity conservation Cited by: Crocodiles and crocodile conservation in Papua New Guinea / Shelley Burgin ; Past and present fishing practices among the people of Tatana Village, Port Moresby / Bobby Gaigo ; Marine turtle conservation in Papua New Guinea / Sylvia C.

Spring ; Shellfishing and management in Papua New Guinea / Pamela Swadling ; The majority of the rural people of Papua New Guinea depend partly or wholly on the use of the region's many species of fauna and flora. Traditional life-styles which have evolved over hundreds of years have developed practices that deliberately set out to conserve wildlife resources, and these include seasonal hunting and harvesting, and giving special protection to certain species that are Cited by:   Traditional Conservation and Utilization of Wildlife in Papua New Guinea NAVU KWAPENA Division of Wildlife, Department of Lands, Surveys and Environment, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea Summary The majority of the rural people of Papua New Guinea depend partly or wholly on.

the use of the region's man3, species of fauna and by: A study is made of the role of traditional conservation practice in protecting the natural and cultural resources of Papua New Guinea.

Traditional conservation practices in the islands of the South Pacific are reputed to have existed for many hundreds of years. This volume includes extensive docu- mentation of the available scientific literature on Papua New Guinea's biota. This report presents a synopsis of the mate- rial contained in the full two volume publication and presents in reduced scale the CNA consensus maps of the high biodiversity areas in Papua New Guinea.

Papua New Guinea's first conservation area, the YUS Conservation Area, was established in on the Huon Peninsula, Morobe Province. Apart from local conservation efforts, PNG is also a signatory to international conventions and treaties.

These international treaties include ". essential for the rational planning and management of future land and forest use, food production, conservation and development in Papua New Guinea.

The State of the Forests of Papua New Guinea. Figure 1: A map of Papua New Guinea showing provincial boundaries and general regions. Each province is shown coloured by the broad region in which it. This book is the most comprehensive and authoritative survey of the traditional pottery of Papua New Guinea ever produced.

The authors have made a thorough analysis of pottery-making throughout Papua New Guinea based on eight years of field work. They proffer a first-hand account of clay preparation, pottery formation, and firing techniques, interwoven with information on the functions of.

Nanda astami brings out the intrinsic message of conservation in a traditional society: (1) It is celebrated only after the flowering and the shedding of seeds by the species has taken place, and hence collection of the same does the least damage in relation to regeneration; and (2) the restriction imposed on the number of harvesters is an effective means to restrict the size of the pool harvested.

A significant contribution to political ecology, Conservation Is Our Government Now is an ethnographic examination of the history and social effects of conservation and development efforts in Papua New Guinea.

Drawing on extensive fieldwork conducted over a period of seven years, Paige West focuses on the Crater Mountain Wildlife Management Area, the site of a biodiversity conservation project.

Many see this ‘bottom up’ community-led governance system as a way forward for conservation in Papua New Guinea, while the modern ‘top down’ government is a relic of the colonial period.

Mongabay reports that John Aini is a traditional community leader in Papua New Guinea as well as an award winning conservationist and fisheries scientist. This is a good introduction to conservation-as-development, conservation-and-development, etc.

West writes very accessibly, and switches easily from theory to anecdote in relation to her time living and working with the people of Maimafu, Papua New Guinea/5(7).

In Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Papua Province, communities are increasingly taking the initiative to establish protected areas themselves, with the help of WWF.

An area where such a commitment has been made at a large scale is in the TransFly, in southcentral New Guinea. There, several villages have pledged a vast area of land for conservation purposes, a commitment they wish to honour with the.

A Wildlife Conservation Society Papua New Guinea, PO BoxGoroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. B Tipu-u Clan, Sohoniliu, Manus Province, Papua New Guinea. C Welei Clan, Lehewa, Manus Province, Papua New Guinea. D Lahok Clan, Tulu 2, Manus Province, Papua New Guinea.

E Corresponding author. Email: [email protected]   Papua New Guinea’s first conservation area An AGS-funded project is working with the traditional tribes of Papua New Guinea to protect endangered wildlife in the nation’s first major conservation area By Mark Ziembicki • J • Reading Time: 10 Minutes Papua New Guinea has rich cultural traditions.

Forest connectivity is important for sustaining Admiralty cuscus (Spilocuscus kraemeri) in traditional terrestrial no-take areas on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea.

Author (s): John Lamaris, Nathan Whitmore. Traditional Religion in Melanesia: Introduction By: Theo Alerts Port Moresby, University of Papua New Guinea press, ISBN The present volume on "Traditional Religion in Melanesia" and its companion volume on "Christianity in Melanesia" were written for various occasions.

Identification. Papua is probably derived from the Malay word papuwah ("fuzzy hair"). Ina Spanish explorer called the island Nuevathe western half of New Guinea was officially recognized as Dutch New Guinea, the northeastern section became German New Guinea, and the southeastern quarter became British New Guinea.

Long-beaked echidnas live only in the New Guinea Highlands, confined to alpine meadows up to 12, feet (3, meters) above sea level, and to the humid mountain forests of the New Guinea highlands.

The short-beaked echidna is still plentiful in Australia, and has no special conservation. Etymology. The word papua is derived from an old local term of uncertain origin.

" New Guinea" (Nueva Guinea) was the name coined by the Spanish explorer Yñigo Ortiz dehe noted the resemblance of the people to those he had earlier seen along the Guinea coast of Africa. Guinea, in its turn, is etymologically derived from the Portuguese word Guiné.WCS Papua New Guinea WCS Papua New Guinea Menu Wild Places; Wildlife Hundreds of cultural groups gather annually to celebrate the country’s Independence Day in their traditional attires.

I STAND FOR WILDLIFE, and STAND FOR WILDLIFE are service marks of Wildlife Conservation Society. Contact Information. Address: Author: Paige West.

Subjects. Anthropology > Cultural Anthropology, Australia/New Zealand/Oceania, Environmental Studies. A significant contribution to political ecology, Conservation Is Our Government Now is an ethnographic examination of the history and social effects of conservation and development efforts in Papua New Guinea.